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Curriculum Vitae

Erin Lloyd Jones is an archaeologist from Wales who specialises in late Prehistoric hillforts and has a wider passion for British heritage and culture.

Erin doesn’t just dig archaeology- she loves it, making sure that other people ‘dig it’ too. As a public engagement archaeologist, it’s her job to get people excited about the past. Roles with the National Trust, Bangor University, the award winning Landscape Partnership Scheme Heather and Hillforts and Cadw, the Welsh Government’s Historic Environment Service, have enabled her to share her passion with both visitors to and residents of the United Kingdom.

She first hit the headlines when she formed a partnership with a London Gallery to exhibit and sell original Picasso & Matisse artworks at north east Wales National Trust property, Erddig. As well as arranging for the property to host Wrexham Food Festival, she also organised an exclusive evening banquet in the grounds; the seven course menu inspired by Edwardian menus stored in the archives at the site.

Her work for Heather and Hillforts has been highly acclaimed, using new technology to interpret ancient sites as well as traditional techniques. This included developing a ‘heritage car park’ using countryside crafts and inspiration from the rich archaeological landscape, awarded the Civic Trust’s Quayle Award for sympathetic design in an historic area. Working with a microbrewery, she helped devise a suite of craft ales, using ingredients from the heather-clad moorlands, named after the hillforts within the Clwydian Range Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

Erin hit the international press when she devised the ‘Hillfort Glow’ experiment, working with over 200 volunteers, reconnecting communities with their local hillfort on ten sites across Wales and England, coming together at dusk to signal to one another using light. This helped raise awareness of the monuments, on a local scale and gathering international interest, exploring how the monuments sit within the landscape and how the hillforts may have connected with one another, long before Twitter and Snapchat!  

Erin’s research at Bangor University digs deeper into this concept, exploring dating evidence of the 100+ hillforts in north Wales and the borders, investigating visibility and whether view was important during site selection, around 2,500 years ago. Using traditional techniques such as excavation and geophysical surveys, paired with Geographical Information Systems, viewshed analysis and radiocarbon dating, she is starting to piece together the mysterious hillfort jigsaw, discovering more about why there are so many in this area of Britain and how they are all connected.

In between her research and working as Heritage Interpretation Manager for Cadw, the Welsh Government’s Historic Environment Service, she is in her element working with the public; sharing her passion for British heritage, traditions and culture through her infectious enthusiasm and fascinating stories about the amazing places she works, lives and loves.

  • 2017
  • Series aired August/ September 2016
  • May 2015

    Heritage Interpretation Manager , Cadw

  • December 2012

    Technician, Oxford University "Rethinking Hillforts" Conference

  • August 2012

    Lifelong Learning Manager, Cadw

  • January 2011

    Community Participation Officer, Heather & Hillforts Project

  • January 2011

    Archaeology PhD- Hillforts in North Wales & the borders, Bangor University

  • September 2010

    Archaeology Graduate Teaching Assistant, Bangor University

  • January 2008

    Interpretation Officer, Heather & Hillforts Project

  • March 2005

    Visitor Services Manager, National Trust Erddig

  • September 2002

    Archaeology with History BA (Hons), University of Liverpool

I have been lucky enough to work in some of the most amazing places in the world.
I have been lucky enough to work in some of the most amazing places in the world.